Tag Archives: Statis Pro

August Injury Report – Week 2

The following is a list of injuries to players which occurred between August 8th and August 15th of the the SP78 season, with injuries noted by date, team, player, and number of days or weeks missed.

August 8th

LA:  While sitting in the dugout talking with pitching coach Red Adams, relief pitcher Charlie Hough was struck on the arm by a foul line drive off the bat of Padres shortstop Ozzie Smith, the second batter of the game. Hough was not hurt, but for precautionary reasons, he was not used in the game, but would be cleared to play the following day.

CLE: In the first inning of their game against the Red Sox, Indians batter Jim Norris was struck on his right elbow by a pitch from Luis Tiant; he was replaced by a pinch-runner and left the game. X-rays showed no breaks or fractures, but Norris would miss four more games due to numbness in the elbow and arm.

August 9th

SF: During pre-game warm-ups, outfielder Larry Herndon pulled a thigh muscle while running wind sprints and would not participate in that afternoon’s contest. He would return to action the following day.

August 10th

OAK: In the second inning of their game against the Angels at Anaheim, A’s rookie Dell Alston ran into first baseman Ron Jackson while rounding the bag after his base hit, and left the game with an unspecified injury. He would miss seven games with what would later be classified as ‘lower body trauma’.

CAL: In the same game, Angels outfielder Lyman Bostock was injured chasing a shallow fly ball off the bat of A’s slugger Rico Carty, a violent collision that again involved first baseman Ron Jackson. Bostock would be lost for a week due to minor head injuries and dizziness, while Jackson was unhurt and remained in the game. It was Bostock’s fourth injury of the SP78 season, good for 22 games missed.

August 13th

NY-N: Another collision between a team’s first baseman and right fielder occurred in a match-up between the Cardinals and Mets at Shea Stadium; in the seventh, a routine fly to right by Dane Iorg fell for a double when Mets outfielder Elliott Maddox slammed into first baseman Willie Montanez, knocking both men to the ground. Montanez was not injured, but Maddox had to be helped off the field, and would be placed on the 15-day disabled list the following day due to a severe neck sprain.

SF: In the sixth inning of a Giants-Dodgers game at Dodger Stadium, Giants reliever Charlie Williams faced just one batter, walking Lee Lacy on four pitches, before signaling to manager Joe Altobelli that he needed to be taken out. He’d go on the 15-DL the next day, suffering from back spasms.

August 14th

CHI-N: Once again, a first baseman and a right fielder collided while chasing a fly ball, sending one man to the disabled list: Bill Buckner, who had settled under a pop-up from Braves batter Darrel Chaney, but never made the play when outfielder Jerry White crashed into him from behind, allowing the ball to drop as both fielders crumbled to the grass. Only Buckner left the game; he was placed on the 15-day DL with what the Cubs team physician described as ‘slight damage and contusions to the back and neck’.

MIN: In one of the more unlikely injuries of the season, Twins starter Gary Serum left the game against the Indians after just 1.1 innings pitched, due to the after-affects of food poisoning. He’d been stricken a few days earlier, and had felt well enough to make the start, but the exertion of pitching just one inning drained him of all energy, and he quickly became both exhausted and nauseated. He would miss one more start before feeling ready to pitch again.

August 15th

HOU: In his first day back after coming off the disabled list, outfielder Denny Walling pulled a calf muscle while taking his cuts during pre-game batting practice, and sat out that day’s game against the Cardinals. He returned to action—albeit as a pinch-hitter—the following day.

MON: Lance Parrish joined the growing list of players running into first basemen after base hits, doing so in the fourth inning of Montreal’s game against the Giants at Olympic Stadium. Parrish would depart for a pinch-runner and would miss the next three games with a knee injury, the result of falling to the stadium’s hard artificial turf after the collision. Mike Ivie, the recipient of Parrish’s wayward impact, remained in the game.

NY-N:  First baseman Willie Montanez was out for three games after chasing a foul off the bat of Padres batter Jerry Turner at Shea Stadium and stumbling into the home dugout, where he twisted his left ankle. X-rays were negative.

SEA: M’s shortstop Craig Reynolds collided with left fielder Tom Paciorek during their game against the Orioles at the Kingdome in Seattle; Reynolds was the only player hurt, and left the game with a strained shoulder. The injury was severe enough to land him on the 15-day disabled list.

5,048 Days

Recently, while spending another evening working on June stats, I began to wonder which of my many game sites had been around the longest…the length of time from its first SP78 game to its last. My initial guess was AZ8, my apartment in Peoria, Arizona that saw a record-setting 218 games played over a 10-year period between 2003 and 2014. I decided to check on-line for an answer, and found a website that allowed me to punch in start and end dates to calculate a time frame in years, months, and days; after tabulating results for all 93 sites, I was surprised to find that AZ8 ranked only third, with a mere 3,739 days under its belt.

Though having hosted a grand total of just 24 games, my Mom’s former apartment in Mesa, Arizona, stood at #2, having served as an SP78 game-playing spot during my several short vacation trips there between 1991 and 2002, and having survived as an SP78 game location a mere six months longer than AZ8. What then was the longest-tenured site? Which building hosted 36 games over the course of an astounding 5,048 days—a distant three years longer than the other two front-running sites—and currently claims the #1 spot? Any guesses?

I’ll offer a few clues: the site was located in California, it was my temporary home for two months after I’d moved back to the area from another city, and was host to the longest 9-inning SP78 game ever played, which took just over two hours to complete. Here’s another hint: the photo below was taken during the final game ever played there, a 5-3 Dodgers win over the Braves:

Game #1058

Anyone figure it out without consulting the Game Sites page? The answer is ESC5, my friend Steve P’s townhome condo in Escondido, California, which served as a Statis Pro destination between June of 1988 and April of 2002, a whopping thirteen years, nine months, and twenty-seven days. The site was host to many memorable SP78 contests during that time, including a 17-inning affair between the Astros and Mets co-managed by Steve and my brother Scott, the infamous Sixto Lezcano Game, and the big 20th Anniversary Game, also co-managed by Steve and Scott.

And for the record, only three other sites have ever hosted games for more than a thousand days: my friend Julie’s RB11 condo (2,056), my ESC11 guesthouse studio (1,910), and the RB3 house where my friend Reid lived (1,514), the latter of which saw just two games hosted over a four-year span in the early-1980s.

Cruz Ten Thefts Shy of Matching AL Mark

With more than six weeks left in the 1978 campaign, Seattle second baseman Julio Cruz, having a career year in only his second season in the majors, is just ten stolen bases away from tying the American League single-season mark of 96, set by Tigers legend Ty Cobb in 1915. And with 42 games remaining on the Mariners schedule, it appears that the major league record of 118, established by Cardinals veteran Lou Brock in 1974, may be in jeopardy as well.

SEA - Julio Cruz“As long as I stay healthy, and can get on base, I think I can do it,” said Cruz before tonight’s doubleheader against the Angels at the Kingdome. If he were to steal a base per game, and barring injury or a sudden slump that would keep him off the basepaths, Cruz would break Cobb’s record on August 25th at Baltimore, and Brock’s milestone at home on September 19th against the Royals.

“Of course I’m playing him every game!” said a surprised Darrell Johnson, manager of the M’s, when asked if he was sticking with Cruz at second for the remainder of the season. “Why wouldn’t I? We’re fifteen games outta first, the guy’s hitting over .300, and he’s about to put this team on the map. You want me to play Bernhardt or Milbourne instead?”

With 86 stolen bases thus far in ’78, Cruz needs just three more to pass Washington outfielder Clyde Milan’s 1912 total to claim the second spot for single-season steals by an AL player in the modern era. Cruz considers that feat alone to be just another shining moment in a season already chock-full of them for the magic Mariners, who are currently tied for fourth place in the AL West. “For a second-year team,” he said, “we’re not doing too bad, are we?”

Stat Night

Stat Night - photo
Just another evening spent working on statistics at the living room table, where for the past several months I’ve been compiling stats for every SP78 game played in June: as the photo above shows, I’m currently at work on Game #777, a June 12th match-up between the Mets and Padres at San Diego Stadium. From here, I have just 235 scoresheets to pore over before I wrap-up the month, and can begin adding the numbers to the blog site.

And after that, I’ll make some minor additions to every team’s July statistics (which are, for the most part, already completed), and when I factor in the current August stats, I’ll be caught up with the season’s stats for the first time since I finished playing the last of the April games back in 1988. Thank heavens I have no social life, or I’d never have time to get any of this done.