Tag Archives: baseball

Cubs Stats For July Are Done!

Season stats through July are now finished for the Cubs, who held on to second place in the NL East despite an underwhelming 11-17 record for the month, and a 50-53 record for the year, which put them 15 games behind the first-place Phillies. Dennis Lamp remained the ace of the staff with a 12-4 mark and a 2.43 ERA, while slugger Dave Kingman’s 27 home runs and 74 RBI ranked him among the league leaders in the National League. Chicago had some trouble with the NL West this month, going 6-13 against the teams of that division; unfortunately, their August slate of games is dominated by NL West opponents as well.

Though you won’t see it yet on the July pages, I’ve begun adding a new stat box to every team page: a SB/CS breakdown for each player, showing separate results for stolen bases and caught stealing of second, third, and home, plus each player’s steal rating (designated by a letter between A and E). Currently these boxes are complete and posted for every team in April, and all NL teams in May; for a sample box, check the Astros page here, and look beneath ‘Games Played by Position’.

And to take a look at the Cubs stat page for July, click here. And remember, the boxes for league leaders, team rankings, and award totals have been left blank; these numbers will be added after all NL team statistics have been finalized, and July award winners have been picked.

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Stat Night Revisited

Stat Night, Revisited
Back in March I posted a quick update of my never-ending work on June stats, which I’d been slaving over for nearly a year: 368 total scoresheets for the month to tabulate, at about 30-45 minutes per page. At the time, I’d made it as far as the 12th of June, which translated to 133 sheets completed, with 235 more to go.

Now, five months later, I’m still hard at work getting those stats wrapped up, but I’m edging ever closer to the finish line. As of today I’ve reached June 24th, with 277 scoresheets completed, and just 91 left to compile. Of course, once I’m done with all of that, I still have to add those stats to the April and May totals, then plug all 26 teams’ worth into their respective blog pages.

And that beat-up green book on the table? A $2 thrift store copy of The Baseball Encyclopedia, given to me by a friend at work.

5,048 Days

Recently, while spending another evening working on June stats, I began to wonder which of my many game sites had been around the longest…the length of time from its first SP78 game to its last. My initial guess was AZ8, my apartment in Peoria, Arizona that saw a record-setting 218 games played over a 10-year period between 2003 and 2014. I decided to check on-line for an answer, and found a website that allowed me to punch in start and end dates to calculate a time frame in years, months, and days; after tabulating results for all 93 sites, I was surprised to find that AZ8 ranked only third, with a mere 3,739 days under its belt.

Though having hosted a grand total of just 24 games, my Mom’s former apartment in Mesa, Arizona, stood at #2, having served as an SP78 game-playing spot during my several short vacation trips there between 1991 and 2002, and having survived as an SP78 game location a mere six months longer than AZ8. What then was the longest-tenured site? Which building hosted 36 games over the course of an astounding 5,048 days—a distant three years longer than the other two front-running sites—and currently claims the #1 spot? Any guesses?

I’ll offer a few clues: the site was located in California, it was my temporary home for two months after I’d moved back to the area from another city, and was host to the longest 9-inning SP78 game ever played, which took just over two hours to complete. Here’s another hint: the photo below was taken during the final game ever played there, a 5-3 Dodgers win over the Braves:

Game #1058

Anyone figure it out without consulting the Game Sites page? The answer is ESC5, my friend Steve P’s townhome condo in Escondido, California, which served as a Statis Pro destination between June of 1988 and April of 2002, a whopping thirteen years, nine months, and twenty-seven days. The site was host to many memorable SP78 contests during that time, including a 17-inning affair between the Astros and Mets co-managed by Steve and my brother Scott, the infamous Sixto Lezcano Game, and the big 20th Anniversary Game, also co-managed by Steve and Scott.

And for the record, only three other sites have ever hosted games for more than a thousand days: my friend Julie’s RB11 condo (2,056), my ESC11 guesthouse studio (1,910), and the RB3 house where my friend Reid lived (1,514), the latter of which saw just two games hosted over a four-year span in the early-1980s.

Cruz Ten Thefts Shy of Matching AL Mark

With more than six weeks left in the 1978 campaign, Seattle second baseman Julio Cruz, having a career year in only his second season in the majors, is just ten stolen bases away from tying the American League single-season mark of 96, set by Tigers legend Ty Cobb in 1915. And with 42 games remaining on the Mariners schedule, it appears that the major league record of 118, established by Cardinals veteran Lou Brock in 1974, may be in jeopardy as well.

SEA - Julio Cruz“As long as I stay healthy, and can get on base, I think I can do it,” said Cruz before tonight’s doubleheader against the Angels at the Kingdome. If he were to steal a base per game, and barring injury or a sudden slump that would keep him off the basepaths, Cruz would break Cobb’s record on August 25th at Baltimore, and Brock’s milestone at home on September 19th against the Royals.

“Of course I’m playing him every game!” said a surprised Darrell Johnson, manager of the M’s, when asked if he was sticking with Cruz at second for the remainder of the season. “Why wouldn’t I? We’re fifteen games outta first, the guy’s hitting over .300, and he’s about to put this team on the map. You want me to play Bernhardt or Milbourne instead?”

With 86 stolen bases thus far in ’78, Cruz needs just three more to pass Washington outfielder Clyde Milan’s 1912 total to claim the second spot for single-season steals by an AL player in the modern era. Cruz considers that feat alone to be just another shining moment in a season already chock-full of them for the magic Mariners, who are currently tied for fourth place in the AL West. “For a second-year team,” he said, “we’re not doing too bad, are we?”

Palmer Tops McNally For O’s Games Pitched Lead

Jim Palmer became Baltimore’s all-time leader BAL - Palmer portraitin games pitched yesterday when he appeared in his 413th game as an Oriole, passing former teammate Dave McNally, in a 6-5 loss to the Yankees at Memorial Stadium. For Palmer, the landmark occasion was dampened by yet another sub-par performance on the mound, a three-inning stint where he allowed four runs on six hits (and served up three walks and a hit-by-pitch as well), resulting in his ninth loss of the year. His SP78 record now stands at 9-9, a stark contrast to the 21-12 mark he finished with at the conclusion of the actual ’78 campaign.

“I can’t figure it out,” said Palmer, addressing the local Baltimore media after the game. “I have a pitcher PB rating of 2-8, yet I can’t seem to catch a break this season. And I didn’t even face Guidry tonight! Who knows, maybe I need to give up this whole ‘pancakes for breakfast’ business, and stick with sugar cereal instead.”

McNally, a 3-time All-Star, played for the O’s from 1962 to 1974, compiling a won-lost record of 181-113 before finishing his career with the Expos in 1975. He and Palmer were members of the last major league squad to boast four 20-game winners in one season, in 1971, a starting rotation that also included Mike Cuellar and Pat Dobson.